Emerald ash borer first detectors

The emerald ash borer is an exotic beetle from Asia that has the potential to decimate our ash tree population in Minnesota.  Read through the following links to learn more about this pest and what you can do.

Recent Emerald Ash borer discoveries.

Think you have Emerald Ash Borer? Answer these questions.

This set of questions will help you identify the possibility of an infestation; please consider them carefully!

How do I know what it looks like?

What are communities doing about it?

Here are some photos of municipalities that are using declining ash trees as “trap” trees. If there are beetles, they’ll be attracted to trap trees, where they’ll be discovered.  By doing this, communities can be more on the alert and take immediate actions.

Think you’ve got EAB? Here’s what to do:

Forest Pest First Detector volunteers have been trained in EAB identification, signs and symptoms, look-a-like insects, and even other species of concern including gypsy moth, Asian long horned beetle, Sirex woodwasp, and thousand cankers on walnut.

If you think you have found emerald ash borer, go through the steps at Do I have emerald ash borer? (246 K PDF) to be sure. Those without internet access can call Forest Resources Extension at 612-624-3020.

Emily Hanson deals with natural resources of urban areas. She is based in St. Paul.

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4 Comments

  1. I am wondering who I should contact regarding an ash tree we have that may be infected with the emerald ash borer. Could you please put me in contact with the right people?

    Thank you.

    1. Hi Carrie. I’ve pasted a quick answer below. For more info, visit Extension’s emerald ash borer page or our page on EAB and Woodlands.

      Think you’ve got EAB? Here’s what to do:

      Forest Pest First Detector volunteers have been trained in EAB identification, signs and symptoms, look-a-like insects, and even other species of concern including gypsy moth, Asian long horned beetle, Sirex woodwasp, and thousand cankers on walnut.

      If you think you have found emerald ash borer, go through the steps at Do I have emerald ash borer? (246 K PDF) to be sure. Those without internet access can call Forest Resources Extension at 612-624-3020.

  2. I spotted what I believe to be two EAB insects today on my walking path in the Opus Center area of Minnetonka.

  3. Thanks Tom. But, in order for us to be able to process reports like this, we need a bit more information. The proper steps to report a possible new EAB discovery are outlined in Do I have emerald ash borer? (246 K PDF).

    It’s not a time consuming process, but it is important. Thank you!
    -eli