Comments sought on state invasive species management plan

(Released by Minnesota DNR on September 3, 2009)

A draft Minnesota Statewide Invasive Species Management Plan (PDF) is now available for public review and comment until Sept. 22.

The plan was developed by the Minnesota Invasive Species Advisory Council, co-chaired by the Minnesota’s departments of Natural Resources (DNR) and Agriculture.

It is designed to provide a framework for addressing both aquatic and terrestrial invasive species issues in Minnesota.

The plan includes strategies and actions to address the main issues related to invasive species: prevention of new introductions into the state; early detection and rapid response to new introductions; containment of populations; and management of established populations to reduce their harm.

This draft plan reflects several years of work by many organizations from the local, state and federal government levels and a number of nongovernmental organizations.

“It will be a good framework for addressing the invasive species issue,” said Jay Rendall, DNR invasive species prevention coordinator. “However, we want to have more input on strategies and actions that could be taken in the future.”

Comments from individuals and organizations will be used to refine and expand the actions identified in the draft plan. When completed, the plan will also provide opportunities for improved coordination and partnerships between federal, state and local governments, tribes, conservation organizations and others working to minimize the impacts caused by invasive species in the state.

The draft plan and information about submitting comments is available on the DNR Web site. Printed copies can be requested by calling 651-259-5100. Written comments can be submitted in writing to Invasive Species Program, Minnesota DNR, 500 Lafayette Road, St. Paul, MN 55155, or by e-mail.

Eli ‘s work addresses Minnesota forest ecology & management. He’s based in St Paul.

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2 Comments

  1. I am commenting as a private citizen. I am however, a University of Minnesota employee, working at the Minnesota Landscape Arboretum. As such, I have a keen and personal interest in the subject of terrestrial invasive species control.

    I very much appreciate the effort and time spent by the task force on developing a comprehensive policy regarding invasive species.

    Regarding the terrestrial species list, I suggest surveying people who actively control invasive exotics in natural areas to determine the level of invasion and agressiveness of spread of genera.

    I think there may be surprises regarding a few species, particularly Phellodendron sp., Euonymus alatus, and Acer ginnala.

    Otherwise, a very good and thorough list.

    Unfortunately, control and monitoring will be determined by the level of funding available for direct control, education and outreach efforts.

    Jeffrey L. Johnson