Stem Girdling Roots: The underground epidemic killing our trees

Download Stem Girdling Roots: The underground epidemic killing our trees (PDF) Gary Johnson, Professor, Urban and Community Forestry, Department of Forest Resources, St. Paul, MN; Dennis Fallon, Vegetation Management Coordinator, Xcel Energy; Andrew Rose, Creative Director, Hand/Eye Communications. How many trees die prematurely each year? Thousands? Millions? Billions? It’s almost impossible to pinpoint, but one unseen culprit – dysfunctional (abnormal) […]

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Finding tree care help: Certified arborists and MN Tree Care Advisors

The following links are useful when looking to hire an arborist or find out more information on arborists. For information on hiring a tree care professional visit:  Hiring an Arborist. This page provides information on when a professional should be hired and important considerations when choosing one. To find a certified arborist in your area visit:   ISA Certified Arborist Search. […]

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Diseases and Insect Pests of Hardwoods (Broadleaf trees)

General Information: Disease Management Recommendations for Trees and Shrubs Specific Diseases/Insects: Anthracnose and Other Leaf Spot Diseases of Maples Anthracnose Diseases of Eastern Hardwoods (USFS) Anthracnose of Shade Trees Aphids on Deciduous Trees and Shrubs Aphids on Trees and Shrubs Apple Scab Armillaria Root Disease USFS Carpenter Ants-can affect any standing wood/lumber Damping-off of Seedlings Emerald Ash Borer Environmentally Conscious […]

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Is My Yard Tree Worth Money?

This handout was developed by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources to help landowners determine if there is wood product value in their yard tree. Not all hardwoods including walnut are valuable. Only yard trees of exceptional quality and significant volume have value.  Due to the cost of removal, only quality hardwoods have enough potential value to be considered. Download […]

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Will Fill Kill?

The truth about adding soil over the roots of existing landscape trees. By Rebecca Koetter and Gary R. Johnson No, the title “Will Fill Kill?” has nothing to do with people’s propensity to stuff their digestive systems during Thanksgiving! Instead, it directs attention to the three most common questions from homeowners about relandscaping and construction activities around their trees: What […]

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Fertilizer and -Cide Application

Fertilizer Applications: Tree Fertilization: A Guide for Fertililzing New and Established Trees in the Landscape This page provides information to determine the need for a fertilizer, the right time to apply and how much at a given time. Manufactured vs. Natural Fertilizers   Pesticide/Insecticide/Herbicide Applications: How to Calculate Herbicide Rates; Calibrate Herbicide Applicators Insecticide Suggestions to Manage Landscape Tree and […]

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Staking and Guying Trees: Best Materials and Technique

Authors: Gary R. Johnson, Associate Professor, Urban and Community Forestry and Marc A. Shippee, Undergraduate Research Assistant. Forest Resources Extension Department When is Staking Necessary? More often than not, staking is unnecessary. Occasionally, newly planted trees may require staking when: They have abnormally small root systems that can’t physically support the larger, above-ground growth (stem and leaves). The stem bends […]

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Five things every woodland owner needs to know

Based on input from our readers and others, our readers’ suggestions, here’s our list of the five things every Minnesota woodland owner needs to know: Rather listen than read? This content is also available as a recorded webinar, about 45 minutes in length, recorded in January 2010.  Click here to watch the recorded webinar (make sure your computer speakers are […]

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Seasonal care for trees & shrubs: Safety

Inspect your landscape trees and shrubs often- especially after storms. After storms, hazard trees with loosely hanging branches or split trunks need to be removed as soon as possible to avoid any damage to buildings, people, and to other trees or shrubs.

At other times of the year keep a watchful eye for developing decay in trunks and roots, broken and hanging branches, dead branches or trees, an abnormally leaning tree, or anything that may indicate that a tree or part of it could fail and cause damage or injury.

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