Wood Duck – Waterfowl “Eye Candy”

The wood duck (Aix sponsa), or “woodie”, is our most exquisitely-colored waterfowl species in Minnesota. The lustrous chestnut and green, and elaborate patterns of the male, distinctive white tear-drop eye patch and white-speckled breast of the female, plus both sexes’ crested heads and long tails, make them “eye candy” to the observer. In flight, this dabbling duck can be recognized […]

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Pileated Woodpecker – Dapper Drummer

An increase in woodpecker calls and drumming will soon mark the advance of spring. One of those noise makers will be the pileated woodpecker (Dryocopus pileatus), one of our largest, most dapper forest birds. A native, year-round resident, it’s mostly black with bold white stripes, a triangular flaming red crest, long chisel-like bill, body up to 19 inches long, and […]

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June 2016 webinar: Importance of managed forests to Minnesota’s forest birds

Tuesday, June 21, 2016, noon – 1:00 p.m. Managed forests provide important breeding habitat for over 100 species of birds in Minnesota. This presentation will discuss the influence of site and landscape factors on forest bird distributions and dynamics in managed forests. The consequences of forest management and timber sale designs will be discussed. Speaker: Alexis Grinde, UMD – Natural […]

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Pollinators – Keeping Our Forests Abuzz and Healthy

By: Jodie Provost, DNR Private Land Habitat Coordinator The news is abuzz about pollinators these days and for good reason. When the insects that pollinate one third of our U.S. diet decline dramatically, it’s time to take note! Wildlife pollinators are responsible for assisting over 80% of the world’s flowering plants, creating healthy ecosystems. These creatures include birds, bats, insects […]

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Evening Grosbeaks – Golden Gems in Decline

By Jodie Provost, DNR Private Land Habitat Coordinator NOTE: A similar article will be appearing in an upcoming issue of the Minnesota Forestry Association newsletter. Have you ever been so fortunate to enjoy a flock of evening grosbeaks at your bird feeder in winter? These heavyset finches of northern coniferous forests look like golden gems decorating the backyard trees. Some […]

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Northern Minnesota phenology report: January 2011

There’s an odd bird that shows up here in the northland every winter. Not odd in the sense that it has extraordinary plumage, or flies in an unusual fashion, rather it is a songbird that eats flesh. It actively hunts down, attacks, and kills, mice, voles, insects, and even other songbirds. All other birds with such eating habits are relegated […]

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Northern Minnesota phenology report: January 2010

There is a progression of fruit eaten by birds as they move through the upper midwest. We are all aware of the summer fruits, the ones we enjoy, those that ripen and spoil within a few days. Think of strawberries, juneberries, raspberries, blueberries, blackberries among others, these are all quite palatable and for the most part familiar to our palates. […]

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