My Healthy Woods: New book on care and management of Southeast Minnesota woodlands

How well do you know your woods?  Is it providing the things you want?  A new publication can help.  Available now is My Healthy Woods: A Handbook for Family Woodland Owners Managing Woods in Southeast Minnesota.  This easy-to-read publication, filled with great information and photos, is a treasure trove for landowners wanting to know more about their woods. The handbook […]

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New book available: Woodland Stewardship, 2nd Edition

Woodland Stewardship: A Practical Guide for Midwestern Landowners, 2nd Edition was published by the University of Minnesota Extension for use by private woodland owners in the Upper Midwest. This revised 2nd edition builds on the highly successful first edition in 1993, which was distributed to tens of thousands of landowners throughout the Midwest.  This new book is designed to help […]

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Finding tree care help: Certified arborists and MN Tree Care Advisors

The following links are useful when looking to hire an arborist or find out more information on arborists. For information on hiring a tree care professional visit:  Hiring an Arborist. This page provides information on when a professional should be hired and important considerations when choosing one. To find a certified arborist in your area visit:   ISA Certified Arborist Search. […]

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Growing Trees from Seed

By Dan A. Meyer, University of Wisconsin Extension and College of Agricultural and Life Sciences Growing trees directly from seed can be more rewarding than planting two- or three-year-old seedlings purchased from a nursery– especially if you collect and prepare the seed yourself.  It is, however, more difficult and time consuming to cultivate trees from seed than from seedlings, and […]

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The Well Planted Tree

A document produced by Krystal Schaufler, Doug Courneya, Gary Johnson, Jeff Gillman, Patrick Weicherding, Carole Kinion Copeland Click to view document as a PDF: The Well Planted Tree This document touches on the following tree planting topics: How to plant containerized trees How to care for a new tree What happens if a tree is planted too deep? What are […]

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Seasonal Care for Trees and Shrubs in Northern U.S. Climates

Welcome to the world of tree care! In the left hand column of the image below, you will find links to the many maintenance duties you can do to help keep your landscape trees healthy and safe. The accompanying chart highlights the most favorable timing for the listed tree care activities. Below this chart you can find links to other complete chart versions that are larger and easier to read.

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Seasonal care for trees & shrubs: Safety

Inspect your landscape trees and shrubs often- especially after storms. After storms, hazard trees with loosely hanging branches or split trunks need to be removed as soon as possible to avoid any damage to buildings, people, and to other trees or shrubs.

At other times of the year keep a watchful eye for developing decay in trunks and roots, broken and hanging branches, dead branches or trees, an abnormally leaning tree, or anything that may indicate that a tree or part of it could fail and cause damage or injury.

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Seasonal care of trees & shrubs: Stem and branch protection

The stems of landscape trees and shrubs may need protection from animals or mechanical equipment, especially during the winter months. Animal damage (feeding or rubbing) can be avoided by placing wire mesh or hardware cloth at least 3” from the stem. Mechanical damage (e.g. lawn mower or weed whip abrasion) can be avoided when a mulch ring (see mulch) or a plastic guard is in place. The plastic guard should only encase the portion of the lower stem that is most likely to be damaged by lawn equipment. As the tree grows the plastic guard will need to be removed and replaced in order to prevent girdling or stem constriction.

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Seasonal care of trees & shrubs: Fertilizing

The recommendations in this chart refer only to nitrogen applications. Before fertilizing your landscape with a complete fertilizer (nitrogen-phosphorus-potassium), contact a soil testing laboratory for a basic soil test [For MN only: U of MN Soil Testing Labratory]. A basic soil test will provide you with readings on organic matter, pH, cation exchange capacity, macronutrients and micronutrients (Smiley, 2003). Soil testing laboratories may offer timing and quantity recommendations for complete fertilizers (N-P-K).

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