Emerald ash borer and your Minnesota woodlands: Management guidelines

Ash management guide for private forest owners  (PDF, 10.5MB plus a single page foldout) is a new resource for family woodland owners in Minnesota who have ash trees on their land. This guide book is a thorough overview of the ash resource in Minnesota including: ash’s history on the landscape; ash tree identification; information on the emerald ash borer (EAB); […]

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Two videos: Natural disturbance-based silviculture and restoring late-successional structure

Back in June 2009, someone named Tom posted a great question about applying the Dauerwald concept in Minnesota.  In a nutshell, the Dauerwald approach involves intensive management designed to maintain a high diversity of tree species and ages.  This approach can be attractive to those interested in active management but less comfortable with more extensive harvests such as clearcuts or […]

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Poem of the month: Woods

Woods I wish to grow dumber, to slip deep into woods that grow blinder with each step I take, until the fingers let go of their numbers and the hands are finally ignorant as paws. Unable to count the petals, I will not know who loves me, who loves me not. Nothing to remember, nothing to forgive, I will stumble […]

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Northern Minnesota phenology report: October 2009

By John Latimer, KAXE Radio, Grand Rapids The arrival of fall is best announced by the leaves of the trees turning color. For many years it was assumed that these colors were in the leaves from the beginning and that as the tree prepared for winter it stopped producing chlorophyll and the intrinsic colors were revealed. Recent studies have shown […]

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Updated content on Minnesota Land Economics

[I thought this message might be of interest to some of our readers:] Dear Colleague: Three new things at Minnesota Land Economics: 1. 2009 assessor estimates of land values. Please be careful. From the site: “In 2009, the Minnesota Legislature created several new classifications for agricultural and timber land in the state. On Minnesota Land Economics, the reclassifications are handled […]

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MyMinnesotaWoods is on Facebook

Last week we created a new MyMinnesotaWoods Facebook page.  If you’re on Facebook, and if you like what we do, visit the page and become a fan. Why Facebook?  One of our primary goals is to reach and engage new people interested in the care and management of Minnesota woodlands. In Minnesota and nationally, the woodland owner population is aging.  […]

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Minnesota forest insect & disease updates

Just a quick post in case you missed it: The Minnesota DNR, Division of Forestry has published the June 2009 Forest Insect & Disease Newsletter (PDF).  This is by far the best source of timely, quality information on insect and disease issues in the Minnesota woods. This summer’s issue includes a play-by-play of the discovery of emerald ash borer in […]

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Minnesota woodlands and climate change

Alternate formats: Narrated presentation: This content is available as a web-based seminar, or “webinar,” recorded on April 20, 2010. Click here to watch the recording now. After watching it, please fill out our quick evaluation form.  Learn more about other Minnesota Extension forestry webinars. Or view just the slides, no narration. PDF version of this page (717KB) Section 1:  How Minnesota’s […]

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Silvopasture

According to the National Range and Pasture Management Handbook, 60 million acres of private forestland are grazed in the United States (Butler, et al. 1997). For years the conventional wisdom among foresters has been that you need to keep the cattle out of the woods if you want to raise high quality trees for timber production. There’s no question that […]

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Small Ownerships: Overview

In addition to limited access to cost-sharing, owners of smaller parcels can be faced with significant forest management challenges. Windstorms, insect outbreaks, and diseases can affect woodlands regardless of boundaries. On smaller parcels though, the costs of treatments to reduce impacts can be prohibitively high. This can lead to less treatment, which can lead to worse outbreaks in the long run.

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